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Breath of life (la vie n’est qu’un souffle) à la fondation Opale

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It is hard to think you would just happen to be walking by the Opale Foundation without previously planning to go visit it! Perched at an altitude of 1,100 meters in a village in the Swiss Alps, you first have to negotiate a few hairpin bends to finally arrive at your destination: the Valais commune of Lens. Even before entering the art center, the visitor can appreciate the natural setting; the Rhone Valley below, snow-capped peaks on the horizon and their reflection in Lake Louché, which borders the Foundation. 

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Is the Humboldt Forum really that bad?

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Friday 26th of November 2021. I am in Berlin (Germany) for a research trip related to my PhD project and the first place I go to visit is the Humboldt Forum: the newly built and opened museum in central Berlin, on the Museum Island. For months I had been following the case of the Humboldt Forum’s reopening which had, for sure, been making noise in the museum world and has, since the project of its creation, been a very controversial project. Read More

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Maro 'Ura. A Polynesian treasure : the mysterious ways of a sacred object

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You may have seen them, those intriguing posters in the streets of Paris: blue, yellow, an unidentified object occupying the space, and a word that is equally unknown to most of us: Maro 'Ura.At most, the subtitle helps us to see more clearly: "a Polynesian treasure". A new surprise: how can this object, which seems so old, so damaged, and whose usefulness is hard to distinguish, be a "treasure"? Read More

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The intimacy of a link between Australian Aboriginal communities and the muséum in Le Havre

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Australie/Le Havre – L’intimité d’un lien exposée actuellement et jusqu’au 7 novembre 2021, au Muséum d’histoire naturelle du Havre, revient sur une expédition scientifique incontournable dans l’histoire de la découverte occidentale du Pacifique. À l’aube du XIXème siècle, ce voyage mène 200 hommes, embarqués sur deux navires – le Géographe and the Naturaliste – sous l’autorité du commandant Nicolas Baudin, jusqu’en Nouvelle-Hollande (actuelle Australie). Parmi eux, deux dessinateurs : Charles-Alexandre Lesueur et Nicolas-Martin Petit, dont l’Œuvre est aujourd’hui conservée au Muséum du Havre. C’est ainsi que l’institution endosse aujourd’hui la responsabilité de transmettre et partager ce témoignage unique et ancien de la biodiversité australienne et des cultures aborigènes. Ce lien, qui relie la ville portuaire à l’Australie est bien celui mis en avant à l’occasion de cette exposition, dans une double perspective historique et contemporaine. Read More

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Gapu Guḻarri Yothu Yindi at the musée du quai Branly-Jacques Chirac: collaboration in Arnhem Land

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[Please note: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this article may contain images or names of deceased persons in photographs or printed material.]

Currently, and for the whole summer, the Martine Aublet mezzanine of the musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac [MQB-JC] hosts the exhibition Gapu Guḻarri Yothu Yindi, Paysages de l’eau au nord de l’Australie. This small space, often dedicated to current research topics or targeting a very specific theme, presents an exhibition entirely based on collaboration and gives a space for Aboriginal voices to explain to visitors the art works on display. Read More

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George Nuku’s trip around the world lands in Rochefort

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"I came to France with the intention of continuing the story.
In one respect, I am literally walking out of the lithographs.
I’m coming out of the picture and I’m in a repeat performance here in Rochefort.
However, the difference is that now the context has changed because this is all history. So the place where this context continues is in the museum."1

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